AARON SORKIN’S STEVE JOBS: Written As An Artist (With A Psychoanalyst’s Sensibility)

Steve Jobs, the recently released film, beautifully written and conceived by Aaron Sorkin, and directed by the gifted Danny Boyle, is brilliant and unexpected. A MUST SEE. I saw a screening at the Director’s Guild on Saturday, October 10th. It is without question Best Picture worthy. I can’t give enough accolades to the director and actors who made the film come to life on the screen. But, I really have to say that Aaron Sorkin’s screenplay is the piece de resistance.

In the panel afterwards – with Aaron Sorkin, Danny Boyle, Kate Winslett, Seth Rogan, and Jeff Daniels – each gave their very special thoughts about the making of this film. I was particularly taken, though, by some of the things Aaron Sorkin said. After all, the film is his vision. And, interestingly enough, he sounded like I think as a psychoanalyst in my office. Here’s what I remember. I’m paraphrasing a bit, but I’ll do my best:

Walter Isaacson wrote a requested biography of Steve, by Steve and his wife. He’s a journalist. It’s a collection of facts. That’s not what art is. Art is not about what happened. You have to have a specific point of view. I didn’t want to do what people already know.

I love this. Therapy isn’t about the facts either. It’s about understanding my patients’ point of view. How they experienced the facts. And, I wouldn’t think of telling them something they already know. Why, then, would they need my help?

Bravo, Aaron Sorkin. You accomplished what you set out to do. The film, Steve Jobs, is a compelling, honest, and moving window into something about the man, Steve Jobs, we couldn’t know on the surface. You’ve given me a perfect jumping off point for my blog piece on the film next week. Stay tuned everyone.

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